The effects of Climate Change (CC) are radically altering the way in which we experience our planet, changing individual and collective security perceptions of our habitat. Much has been done, from international climate agreements to local actions. However, it emerges how preponderant is the approach related to mitigation, which means reducing those factors that cause global warming, and how little adaptation to climate change impacts is yet systematic. Urban planning and architecture play a central role in this phase of reinterpreting our habitat. Climate Adaptation Planning (CAP) could thus be the effective response we have to deal with climate-related disasters or losses of land and economic resources. At the same time, the old conflicts of cities persist, and new ones emerge, overlapping and exacerbated by CC. Again, design disciplines started formulating new ways of making planning, oriented toward specific and sectoral solutions. The thesis argued in this dissertation is that CAP can be a valuable coordination approach between sectoral plannings, suggesting that climate impacts management can globally support more efficient and effective use of planning resources. The dissertation explores the interaction between CAP and 4 planning approaches: Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP), Alpine Space Planning (ASP), Metropolitan Multi-Risk Planning (MMP), and Resilience Decision Planning (RDP). The dissertation is based on four research papers published during the doctoral track, each associated with one of the interactions between CAP and planning models. The goal of the dissertation is to suggest how this research process can be expanded and effectively operationalized by testing the interaction versatility between different planning disciplines. The four papers and dissertation focus on the case study of the Northern Adriatic, one of the main seas in the Euro-Mediterranean system by addressing the spatial dimension of the investigation through ICT modelling tools. Collective findings from the research highlight the need for a coordinated interaction among advanced planning approaches and that CAP can be the core answer to fill this gap. The dissertation is consciously oriented toward the funding horizons available for action against CC and for supporting new models of sustainable growth and aims to focus on what may be possible outputs for CAP implementation.

The effects of Climate Change (CC) are radically altering the way in which we experience our planet, changing individual and collective security perceptions of our habitat. Much has been done, from international climate agreements to local actions. However, it emerges how preponderant is the approach related to mitigation, which means reducing those factors that cause global warming, and how little adaptation to climate change impacts is yet systematic. Urban planning and architecture play a central role in this phase of reinterpreting our habitat. Climate Adaptation Planning (CAP) could thus be the effective response we have to deal with climate-related disasters or losses of land and economic resources. At the same time, the old conflicts of cities persist, and new ones emerge, overlapping and exacerbated by CC. Again, design disciplines started formulating new ways of making planning, oriented toward specific and sectoral solutions. The thesis argued in this dissertation is that CAP can be a valuable coordination approach between sectoral plannings, suggesting that climate impacts management can globally support more efficient and effective use of planning resources. The dissertation explores the interaction between CAP and 4 planning approaches: Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP), Alpine Space Planning (ASP), Metropolitan Multi-Risk Planning (MMP), and Resilience Decision Planning (RDP). The dissertation is based on four research papers published during the doctoral track, each associated with one of the interactions between CAP and planning models. The goal of the dissertation is to suggest how this research process can be expanded and effectively operationalized by testing the interaction versatility between different planning disciplines. The four papers and dissertation focus on the case study of the Northern Adriatic, one of the main seas in the Euro-Mediterranean system by addressing the spatial dimension of the investigation through ICT modelling tools. Collective findings from the research highlight the need for a coordinated interaction among advanced planning approaches and that CAP can be the core answer to fill this gap. The dissertation is consciously oriented toward the funding horizons available for action against CC and for supporting new models of sustainable growth and aims to focus on what may be possible outputs for CAP implementation.

Towards the Implementation of Climate Adaptation Planning: Approaching the Case Study of the North Adriatic Sea Through Four Research Paper / Dall'Omo, CARLO FEDERICO. - (2022 Sep 30). [10.25432/dall-omo-carlo-federico_phd2022-09-30]

Towards the Implementation of Climate Adaptation Planning: Approaching the Case Study of the North Adriatic Sea Through Four Research Paper.

DALL'OMO, CARLO FEDERICO
2022

Abstract

The effects of Climate Change (CC) are radically altering the way in which we experience our planet, changing individual and collective security perceptions of our habitat. Much has been done, from international climate agreements to local actions. However, it emerges how preponderant is the approach related to mitigation, which means reducing those factors that cause global warming, and how little adaptation to climate change impacts is yet systematic. Urban planning and architecture play a central role in this phase of reinterpreting our habitat. Climate Adaptation Planning (CAP) could thus be the effective response we have to deal with climate-related disasters or losses of land and economic resources. At the same time, the old conflicts of cities persist, and new ones emerge, overlapping and exacerbated by CC. Again, design disciplines started formulating new ways of making planning, oriented toward specific and sectoral solutions. The thesis argued in this dissertation is that CAP can be a valuable coordination approach between sectoral plannings, suggesting that climate impacts management can globally support more efficient and effective use of planning resources. The dissertation explores the interaction between CAP and 4 planning approaches: Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP), Alpine Space Planning (ASP), Metropolitan Multi-Risk Planning (MMP), and Resilience Decision Planning (RDP). The dissertation is based on four research papers published during the doctoral track, each associated with one of the interactions between CAP and planning models. The goal of the dissertation is to suggest how this research process can be expanded and effectively operationalized by testing the interaction versatility between different planning disciplines. The four papers and dissertation focus on the case study of the Northern Adriatic, one of the main seas in the Euro-Mediterranean system by addressing the spatial dimension of the investigation through ICT modelling tools. Collective findings from the research highlight the need for a coordinated interaction among advanced planning approaches and that CAP can be the core answer to fill this gap. The dissertation is consciously oriented toward the funding horizons available for action against CC and for supporting new models of sustainable growth and aims to focus on what may be possible outputs for CAP implementation.
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ARCHITETTURA, CITTA' E DESIGN
Towards the Implementation of Climate Adaptation Planning: Approaching the Case Study of the North Adriatic Sea Through Four Research Paper / Dall'Omo, CARLO FEDERICO. - (2022 Sep 30). [10.25432/dall-omo-carlo-federico_phd2022-09-30]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11578/319366
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